Lesson on correct ways to use the metronome by Graham Fitch

Graham Fitch talks through the correct ways to use the metronome. I know, I know, this is on piano and I’m running a guitar site, but I love Fitch’s lessons via Pianist Magazine on YouTube. I watch his lessons all the time because thinking in terms of music and not guitar can be very beneficial. It gets you away from all the guitar related complications and focuses you on the music. I used to (and still do) attend masterclasses for other instruments and have learned more about music from cross-disciplinary observation than from guitar lessons. In fact, I used to take lessons from violin and piano teachers to critique my actual musical playing.


Help Support the Site


Support the site. You're reading one of the most popular independent classical guitar publications online. The website, newsletter, and lessons are available to everyone for free. But it’s difficult and expensive work. Corporations and social media have caused falling revenues across the web making it increasingly challenging for independent publishers. If you value the website, newsletter, free lessons, or sheet music, please consider offering your support to keep its future sustainable and secure. – Bradford Werner


1 Comment

  1. I’ve seen many of Graham Fitch’s videos for Steinway and they are all excellent….he is obviously a wonderful teacher. When it comes to the use of metronomes, I think it’s a case of ‘less is more’. As we all know (or should know) many, perhaps most, metronome markings are editorial. That is, they were not put there by the composer, but by the person editing the score. This is particularly so with older music, composed before say 1800.

    It’s true to say that some of us need the guidance of metronomes, more than others. A competent teacher should be able to recognise where a student’s sense of rhythm….pulse…is deficient and give guidance regarding the judicious use of a metronome. What should be avoided, though, is overuse of, or overreliance on a metronome….it can literally kill a student’s (innate?) ability in the use of rubato, which is an essential element in any worthwhile musical performance.

    The metronome is a great tool, but a bad master. Cheers.

Leave a Reply