Lesson: Right Hand Fingering for Classical Guitar

Part 1 – YouTube Link (4k)
This is Part 1 of a 4 part lesson series on right hand fingering for classical guitar. In the first overview lesson I cover 3 main concepts: alternating right hand fingers, right hand string-crossings and awkward string-crossings, and how practicing technique will help secure good habits and offer a model for good right hand fingering. Subscribe via the email newsletter to catch parts 2-4 or just come back to this page.

Part 2 – YouTube Link
In the second video I discuss a number of specific ideas and pieces. Don’t worry about playing them, just soak in the talk for future reference. The main theme is to consider concepts, ergonomics, and special considerations of the piece when deciding on a fingering.

Part 3 – YouTube Link
In the third video I discuss the variables in regards to choosing free stroke or rest stroke. This video explores the topic to give an idea about how to make informed decisions.

Part 4 – YouTube Link
This is Part 4 of a 4 part lesson series on right hand fingering for classical guitar. In this final overview I discuss how to become confident about choosing right hand fingering and the process of going from beginner to advanced in the topic. I also introduce some possible materials.

Books Mentioned in the Videos

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3 Comments

  1. Hi, I wonder if you could comment on a problem I’ve been having since I grew my thumbnail. I find in order to strike the string with the thumb I need to alter my right hand position and ‘arch’ the wrist. Is this something you find yourself doing, or perhaps my nail needs to be longer. I realize, not seeing my nail or hand position, there is little you can say specifically about this problem, but wonder if your students have had a similar problem. I was quite secure in playing with the flesh, but now I’ve taken the trouble of grow my nail, I find it destabilizes my usual hand position.

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